July 2018 Monthly Meeting w/ Adele Morris of the Brookings Institution

July 14, 2018

If you want to learn about carbon pricing, Adele Morris is the person to talk to. She is a senior fellow and policy director for Climate and Energy Economics at the Brookings Institution. Her research informs critical decisions related to climate change, energy, and tax policy. She is a leading global expert on the design of carbon pricing policies. Before joining Brookings in July 2008, she worked with the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) of the U.S. Congress, where she advised members and staff on economic, energy, and environmental policy. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University, an M.S. in Mathematics from the University of Utah, and a B.A. from Rice University.

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July 2018 Monthly Meeting w/ Adele Morris of the Brookings Institution

July 14, 2018

If you want to learn about carbon pricing, Adele Morris is the person to talk to. She is a senior fellow and policy director for Climate and Energy Economics at the Brookings Institution. Her research informs critical decisions related to climate change, energy, and tax policy. She is a leading global expert on the design of carbon pricing policies. Before joining Brookings in July 2008, she worked with the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) of the U.S. Congress, where she advised members and staff on economic, energy, and environmental policy. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University, an M.S. in Mathematics from the University of Utah, and a B.A. from Rice University.

Watch Now:

CCU: The World Bank’s 2018 State and Trends in Carbon Pricing Report

July 3, 2018

 

In May 2018, the World Bank released its newest 2018 edition of the annual State & Trends of Carbon Pricing Report and Citizens’ Climate University offered a special webinar for any interested CCL supporter who wanted to tune in live from its annual Advanced Climate Policy Camp taking place at American University in Washington, DC.

Join Dominik Englert, World Bank Economist, in a webinar that walks through three learning goals:

1. describing updates to carbon pricing initiatives happening on various levels (subnational, national, regional, international);

2. identifying trends and anticipating future requirements for carbon pricing initiatives;

3. understanding the international context in which governments consider and discuss the use of carbon pricing.

Watch Now:

CCU: The World Bank’s 2018 State and Trends in Carbon Pricing Report (Audio)

July 3, 2018

Audio Only: In May 2018, the World Bank released its newest 2018 edition of the annual State & Trends of Carbon Pricing Report and Citizens’ Climate University offered a special webinar for any interested CCL supporter who wanted to tune in live from its annual Advanced Climate Policy Camp taking place at American University in Washington, DC.

Join Dominik Englert, World Bank Economist, in a webinar that walks through three learning goals:

1. describing updates to carbon pricing initiatives happening on various levels (subnational, national, regional, international);

2. identifying trends and anticipating future requirements for carbon pricing initiatives;

3. understanding the international context in which governments consider and discuss the use of carbon pricing.

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CC Radio Ep 25 Race, Pollution, Justice — Brentin Mock, Tyree Daye, Dr. Natasha DeJarnett

June 23, 2018

After 10 years of reporting on race, culture, and civil rights, Brentin Mock embraced environmental issues as his new beat. That was in 2008. He has since become a leading voice highlighting environmental racism in America.  He speaks with Citizens Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano about pollution, segregation, asthma, and mobility. Brentin also speaks candidly about failures of predominately white environmental organizations that attempt to reach out to people of color. He shares why these attempts fail and what climate advocates can do to build a more diverse coalition. Also joining the discussion is Dr. Natasha DeJarnett, environmental health policy analyst from the American Public Health Association. She outlines statistics on historical and contemporary pollution and how air and water pollution pose severe heath risks for everyone, but espeically people of color in the USA. brentin-mock.jpg

Art House

Joining us in the Art House today is poet Tyree Daye. As an African-American man living in the  the US South, Tyree weaves together stories and voices from his family. He artistically expresses the collective trauma they have experienced and the deep insights passed down. Rivers, water, and flooding continually come up in his book of poetry called River Hymns. Tyree talks about his poetry and reads pieces from the book and new poetry. 

Puzzler

You are on a break with a co-worker, let's call him Murphy. You tell Murphy about a climate change conference you attended hoping to engage him in conversation. Murphy blurts out, "Seriously. I never pegged you as one of those save the whales and the polar bears kinda person. The way I see it, humans are the most adaptable beings on earth. Whatever is coming our way, we will be able to handle it. Sucks for other creatures, but humans will be just fine."

Murphy has put just you in a certain environmental box. It may or may not be a fit for you. But how can you respond to Murphy to help crack open the conversation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from.

Get back to him by July, 15, 2018. You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or better yet leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

  • African-Americans faced 54% higher health burden from air pollution (particulate matter) compared to the overall population. Communities of color overall had a 28% higher health burden compared to the overall population (Mikati et al., 2018).
  • Communities of color have higher exposure rates to air pollution than their white, non-Hispanic counterparts. A study monitoring 12 air pollutants showed that whites had the lowest exposures, non-Hispanic blacks had higher exposures than whites to 13 of the 14 pollutants. Hispanics generally had the highest exposures (Bell & Ebisu, 2012). Some of the pollutants studied including particulate matter, nitrate, chlorine, nickel are connected to repertory illnesses, asthma, and cardiovascular issues.
  • From a 2010 CDC report, seven million American children have asthma, about one out of ten. One out of every six black child has asthma (CDC, 2010). The reported rate rose 50% between 2001 and 2010.
  • In 2000 and 2010, disparities in nitrogen dioxide concentrations were larger by race-ethnicity than by income. Black and Hispanic people experienced 37% higher exposures to NO2 than white people in 2010 (Clark et al., 2017). NO2 is linked to asthma symptoms, increased susceptibility to repertory problems and heart disease (EPA).
  • Most communities located next to, and directly affected by the operations of, corporate, industrial, or service facilities are low-income, communities of color, and other systemically oppressed groups. This placement exposes these groups of people to health, economic, and social hazards. Over 1 million African-Americans live in counties facing cancer risks above the EPA’s level of concern from toxins emitted by natural gas facilities. (Franklin, 2018)
  • The percentage of black people in fenceline zones is 75% greater than for the U.S. as a whole, while the percentage of Latino people is 60% greater than for the U.S. as a whole (Orum et al., 2014). Larger, more chemical-intensive facilities tend to be located in counties with larger black populations and counties with high levels of income inequality.
  • People of color are more likely to be exposed to environmental threats than are whites of the same social class. Race is a powerful predictor of many environmental hazards including the distribution of air pollution, location of municipal solid waste facilities, location of abandoned toxic waste sites, toxic fish consumption, and lead poisoning in children (Bullard, 1993).
  • People of color make up nearly half the population in fenceline zones (11.4 million), and are almost twice as likely as whites to live near dangerous chemical facilities. Children of color make up almost two-thirds of the 5.7 million children who live within one mile of a high-risk chemical facility in the United States. Facilities in communities of color have almost twice the rate of incidents compared to those in predominately white neighborhoods – one incident per six facilities compared to one incident per 11 facilities (Starbuck & White, 2016).

          (Special thanks to Dr. Natasha DeJarnett and Siena Fouse from the APHA for Dig Deeper content)

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CCU: Extended Q&A with Nathaniel Stinnett, Executive Director, Environmental Voter Project

June 22, 2018

Join us for this month’s extended Q&A with Nathaniel Stinnett, the Founder and Executive Director of the Environmental Voter Project.

Nathaniel was CCL’s June National Speaker and answers questions CCL volunteers submitted about environmental voters as well as sharing additional details about the presentation material covered in this month’s call, the Environmental Voter Project’s next priorities, and how CCL volunteers can help engage in helping build voting habits for environmental voters.

Watch Now:

CCL 2018: Covering Climate Change in the Current Political Landscape

June 22, 2018

The election of 2016 brought new and unexpected challenges for journalists who cover climate change.

While many news outlets now devote more resources to climate change, as one reporter noted, "I spend much of my time writing obits for climate policy." New York Times reporter Lisa Friedman moderates a panel discussion among four journalists who cover climate change across a wide spectrum of media outlets -- from the Pulitzer Prize winning InsideClimate News to the conservative-leaning Washington Examiner.

Hear how the current landscape has altered the public discourse on climate change and how the media approach this topic.

Steve Valk Moderator Citizens' Climate Lobby/Citizens' Climate Education Communications Director

John Siciliano Speaker Washington Examiner Journalist

Marianne Lavelle Speaker Inside Climate News Journalist

Rebecca Leber Speaker Mother Jones Journalist

Robin Bravender Speaker E&E News Journalist

CCL 2018: Stories from the Ski Industry: How Advocacy is an Approach from All Angles

June 22, 2018

How can we as outdoor enthusiasts leverage our story to create effective change?

We will hear from four panelists to explain how they are personally impacted by climate change today, how they are engaging in citizen advocacy as a way to leverage their passion and appreciation for the outdoors, and explore what the strategies are industry wide.

Bill Barron Moderator Citizens' Climate Lobby Wild West Regional Coordinator

Simi Hamilton Speaker Team USA Cross Country Skier

Angel Collinson Speaker Professional Big Mountain skier

Ben Popp Speaker American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation Executive Director

Laura Schaffer Speaker POWDR Sustainability Director

CCL 2018: How Businesses Are Advocating for Climate Policy

June 22, 2018

Reversing climate change will require getting the economics right. Experts agree that meaningful carbon pricing policies are a foundational keystone and will encourage investors and business leaders to lead the way in innovation and transitioning to a clean energy economy.

In this session we will hear from business leaders who will describe what their companies are doing to help the planet and their bottom line.

Harold Hedelman Moderator Business Climate Leaders Director of Engagement

Brad Figel Speaker Mars Corporation Vice President of Public Affairs

Anna Pavlova Speaker Schneider Electric Vice President, Government Relations

Joseph Mendelson III Speaker Tesla Senior Counsel, Business and Policy Development

CCU: Extended Q&A with Nathaniel Stinnett, Executive Director, Environmental Voter Project (Audio)

June 22, 2018

Audio Only: Join us for this month’s extended Q&A with Nathaniel Stinnett, the Founder and Executive Director of the Environmental Voter Project.

Nathaniel was CCL’s June National Speaker and answers questions CCL volunteers submitted about environmental voters as well as sharing additional details about the presentation material covered in this month’s call, the Environmental Voter Project’s next priorities, and how CCL volunteers can help engage in helping build voting habits for environmental voters.

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