CC Radio Ep 25 Race, Pollution, Justice — Brentin Mock, Tyree Daye, Dr. Natasha DeJarnett

June 23, 2018

After 10 years of reporting on race, culture, and civil rights, Brentin Mock embraced environmental issues as his new beat. That was in 2008. He has since become a leading voice highlighting environmental racism in America.  He speaks with Citizens Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano about pollution, segregation, asthma, and mobility. Brentin also speaks candidly about failures of predominately white environmental organizations that attempt to reach out to people of color. He shares why these attempts fail and what climate advocates can do to build a more diverse coalition. Also joining the discussion is Dr. Natasha DeJarnett, environmental health policy analyst from the American Public Health Association. She outlines statistics on historical and contemporary pollution and how air and water pollution pose severe heath risks for everyone, but espeically people of color in the USA. brentin-mock.jpg

Art House

Joining us in the Art House today is poet Tyree Daye. As an African-American man living in the  the US South, Tyree weaves together stories and voices from his family. He artistically expresses the collective trauma they have experienced and the deep insights passed down. Rivers, water, and flooding continually come up in his book of poetry called River Hymns. Tyree talks about his poetry and reads pieces from the book and new poetry. 

Puzzler

You are on a break with a co-worker, let's call him Murphy. You tell Murphy about a climate change conference you attended hoping to engage him in conversation. Murphy blurts out, "Seriously. I never pegged you as one of those save the whales and the polar bears kinda person. The way I see it, humans are the most adaptable beings on earth. Whatever is coming our way, we will be able to handle it. Sucks for other creatures, but humans will be just fine."

Murphy has put just you in a certain environmental box. It may or may not be a fit for you. But how can you respond to Murphy to help crack open the conversation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from.

Get back to him by July, 15, 2018. You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or better yet leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

  • African-Americans faced 54% higher health burden from air pollution (particulate matter) compared to the overall population. Communities of color overall had a 28% higher health burden compared to the overall population (Mikati et al., 2018).
  • Communities of color have higher exposure rates to air pollution than their white, non-Hispanic counterparts. A study monitoring 12 air pollutants showed that whites had the lowest exposures, non-Hispanic blacks had higher exposures than whites to 13 of the 14 pollutants. Hispanics generally had the highest exposures (Bell & Ebisu, 2012). Some of the pollutants studied including particulate matter, nitrate, chlorine, nickel are connected to repertory illnesses, asthma, and cardiovascular issues.
  • From a 2010 CDC report, seven million American children have asthma, about one out of ten. One out of every six black child has asthma (CDC, 2010). The reported rate rose 50% between 2001 and 2010.
  • In 2000 and 2010, disparities in nitrogen dioxide concentrations were larger by race-ethnicity than by income. Black and Hispanic people experienced 37% higher exposures to NO2 than white people in 2010 (Clark et al., 2017). NO2 is linked to asthma symptoms, increased susceptibility to repertory problems and heart disease (EPA).
  • Most communities located next to, and directly affected by the operations of, corporate, industrial, or service facilities are low-income, communities of color, and other systemically oppressed groups. This placement exposes these groups of people to health, economic, and social hazards. Over 1 million African-Americans live in counties facing cancer risks above the EPA’s level of concern from toxins emitted by natural gas facilities. (Franklin, 2018)
  • The percentage of black people in fenceline zones is 75% greater than for the U.S. as a whole, while the percentage of Latino people is 60% greater than for the U.S. as a whole (Orum et al., 2014). Larger, more chemical-intensive facilities tend to be located in counties with larger black populations and counties with high levels of income inequality.
  • People of color are more likely to be exposed to environmental threats than are whites of the same social class. Race is a powerful predictor of many environmental hazards including the distribution of air pollution, location of municipal solid waste facilities, location of abandoned toxic waste sites, toxic fish consumption, and lead poisoning in children (Bullard, 1993).
  • People of color make up nearly half the population in fenceline zones (11.4 million), and are almost twice as likely as whites to live near dangerous chemical facilities. Children of color make up almost two-thirds of the 5.7 million children who live within one mile of a high-risk chemical facility in the United States. Facilities in communities of color have almost twice the rate of incidents compared to those in predominately white neighborhoods – one incident per six facilities compared to one incident per 11 facilities (Starbuck & White, 2016).

          (Special thanks to Dr. Natasha DeJarnett and Siena Fouse from the APHA for Dig Deeper content)

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioSoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CC Radio Ep 24 Climate Comedy

May 26, 2018

Conversations about climate change can get downright dire and dreary. But isn't there room for comedy? Brian Ettling is a comic who is not ashamed to pull out a rubber chicken for a gag. He joins show host, Peterson Toscano for a lively conversation about climate comedy.

Art House

Playwright Chantal Bilodeau returns to the Art House. This time she tells us about two visual artists whose work helps make the invisible worlds of pollution and climate change visual in very visceral ways. Learn about American artist, Eve Mosher with her flood lines, and Chinese artist, Brother Nut and his pollution bricks.

Puzzler

Should we just wait for a technical fix to climate change? We hear what you have to say to Samantha who believes geo-engineering will solve all of our climate woes.

New Puzzler Question

You are on a break with a co-worker, let's call him Murphy. You tell Murphy about a climate change conference you attended hoping to engage him in conversation. Murphy blurts out, "Seriously. I never pegged you as one of those save the whales and the polar bears kinda person. The way I see it, humans are the most adaptable beings on earth. Whatever is coming our way, we will be able to handle it. Sucks for other creatures, but humans will be just fine."

Murphy has put just you in a certain environmental box. It may or may not be a fit for you. But how can you respond to Murphy to help crack open the conversation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from.

Get back to him by July, 15, 2018. You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or better yet leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioSoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

All music is royalty free and purchased thorough PremiumBeat.com and AudioBlocks

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CCR Ep 23 Your Mental Health and Climate Change

April 28, 2018

How does climate change affect us psychologically? How do extreme weather events impact our mental health? What can we do to protect ourselves and our family from the mental health risks that come with extreme weather? How can climate advocates avoid being overwhelmed by the work and address the anxiety, the anger, and the despair? You will hear answers to these questions and much more on our latest episode.

Dr. Lise Van Susteren, a leading expert in looking at the psychological effects of climate change, and Dr. Natasha DeJarnett, a policy analysis in environmental health at the American Public Health Association, join show host, Peterson Toscano, for a thought-provoking and insightful conversation.

Art House

Artist Fritz Horstman talks about his trip to the Arctic Circle to take underwater photographs. The visual landscape of the frozen and thawing North captivated him, but the sounds really inspired him. He asked his fellow artists on the voyage to recreate the creaks and groans of the glaciers for his video, Ice Voices. Watch the video over on Vimeo

Puzzler

 
On FB you you encourage people engage in climate action and join your group. A friend of yours, let's call her Samantha, comments, "That's very noble of you, but really the only solution is going to be a technical one. It's gone too far and they are going to have to geoengineer a solution. Don't stress about it. They are working on a fix somewhere."
So what do you say to Samantha who believes geoengineering will solve all of our climate woes and we should just live our lives until the patch is available?

Get back to Peterson by May, 15, 2018. Email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org
You can also leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioSoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

All music is royalty free and purchased thorough PremiumBeat.com and AudioBlocks

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CCR Ep 22 Claire Vaye Watkins and Climate Storytelling

March 23, 2018

Claire Vaye Watkins, author of the cli-fi novel, Gold Fame Citrus, is Peterson Toscano's special guest. Claire talks about her book and the importance of storytelling in this time of climate change.

With her writing and imagination, she allows herself to go to places many climate advocates avoid. In doing so, she raises important questions about our work and this critical time in history. Wise, insightful, and witty, hearing this interview will help you hone your own skills as a storyteller.

Art House

This month Claire Vaye Watkins is both our main guest and our Art House guest. Stay tuned for upcoming Art House episodes featuring artist, Fritz Horseman, and climate change-themed band, Hayride Casualties.

Puzzler

We share multiple responses to January's puzzler--which was really an accusation: What are you actually doing to address climate change? What does an climate advocate say when someone dismisses you as a hypocrite?

New Puzzler Question

On FB you you encouraged people engage in climate action and join your group. A friend of yours, let's call her Samantha, comments, "That's very noble of you, but really the only solution is going to be a technical one. It's gone too far and they are going to have to geo-engineer a solution. Don't stress about it. They are working on a fix somewhere."

So what do you say to Samantha who believes geoengineering will solve all of our climate woes and we should just live our lives until the patch is available?

Get back to Peterson by April, 15, 2018. You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioSoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle PlayPlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

All music is royalty free and purchased thorough PremiumBeat.com and AudioBlocks

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CCR Ep 21 Day Zero — Cape Town Water Crisis

February 24, 2018

Day Zero is coming to Cape Town, South Africa. What happens when a city of four million people runs out of water? Our host, Peterson Toscano, chats with two Cape Town residents, Helen Moffett and Judy Abrahams. Together they explore "Day Zero," the day when their city will turn off the water to the taps.

Discover the multiple causes of this crisis and the role climate change has played. Hear about the responses, both the ugly and the beautiful. Funny, insightful, and well informed, Helen and Judy talk about many aspects of the crisis that are being overlooked in the media.

Puzzler Question and Art House

The story of the water crisis is so big we will share the many answers to the popular puzzler question next month when writer Claire Vaye Watkins talks about her cli-fi novel--Gold Fame Citrus.

Dig Deeper

Listen, Rate, and Share!

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher Radio, SoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle Play, PlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

All music is royalty free and purchased thorough PremiumBeat.com and AudioBlocks

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CC Radio Ep 20 When the oil folks embrace the wind

January 20, 2018

Grant Samms was curious about the expansion of wind energy in Western Oklahoma, especially in the oil town of Woodward. He expected to see a lot of conflict there. Turns out there was no conflict. Because of their identity as energy producers, the citizens of Woodward found a way to weave wind energy extraction into their lives and economy. 

Grant is currently at Washington College's Center for Environment and Society in Chestertown, Maryland, where he is witnessing tensions in rural Maryland over proposed windmill farms. He chats with Citizens' Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano, about what he learned in Western Oklahoma and how it essential for climate advocates to understand how "sense of place" plays a major role in affecting how communities respond to new ideas.   

Art House

Sila_hunting.jpgChantal Bilodeau is a playwright originally from Quebec Province in Canada. Her award winning plays take on climate change. Set in the Arctic, they are beautiful, original, and are moving audiences all over the world. In her Arctic Cycle plays, she has roles for human and non-human characters. Chantal believes live theater experiences create special opportunities for audiences.

In order to address the lonliness and isolation that can come with doing creative work around global warming, Chantal created Artists and Climate Change, a website that is connecting artists all over the world and making their work known to climate advocates. She is also committed to bringing original quality climate theater to many communities. She talks about Climate Change Theatre Action. Learn how you can easily and inexpensively host a reading of short climate plays. 

Puzzler Question

The Puzzler is BACK! Our latest question is one that often is thrown in the face of climate advocates in order to silence us. 

You are at a community event talking to a neighbor, let's call him Greg. You reveal your passion about climate change and climate solutions. Greg looks you up and down and says, "So I guess you don't use any fossils fuels yourself. You don't drive a car, travel by plane, or heat and cool your home? What are you actually doing to address climate change in your life?"

Greg's question sounds more like an accusation. How do you answer the question while also addressing the accusation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from. Respond by February, 15, 2018. Email radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of three minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Listen, Rate, and Share!

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher Radio, SoundCloudPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CC Radio Ep 19 Promoting Emotional Health and Bee Populations

December 23, 2017

Being a climate advocate can be an emotional rollercoaster. This is especially true for millennials. From childhood they heard about the many impending dangers threatening their future happiness. How do these feelings affect each of us? How do we cope? How do we move past paralyzing despair to a place of hope and action?

Podcast host, Peterson Toscano, shares a conversation he had with Marlo Firme, a Canadian CCL volunteer climate lobbyist. Marlo powerfully reveals the many ways climate change has affected him personally and professionally. From his boyhood in the Philippines to living in British Columbia, Canada, Marlo could not ignore climate change. Still he found a beautiful way forward. He shares is insights and wisdom. 

The Art House

Can art save the bees? Sculptor Emily Puthoff is a attempting to do just that through the Hudson Valley Bee Habitat. She along with her fellow artists are engaging their community in a large scale art project that builds bee habitats. Learn about this ambitious project and about the essential roles bees play in our everyday life. 

 

Kingston Bee-Line from Emily Puthoff on Vimeo.

Puzzler Question

Do you find having a puzzler question is a helpful feature in the podcast? Tell us if you want to continue with the puzzler question section or if you think we should try something different. Contact Peterson: radio @ citizensclimate.org 

Dig Deeper

Many Ways to Listen and to Share

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

IF you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CCR Ep 18 Aaron Telitz Race Driver Climate Advocate

November 27, 2017

Today on the show you are going to meet an unlikely climate advocate, Aaron Telitz--an Indy car racer. Originally from Birchwood, WI, Aaron grew up at a fishing resort and could filet a bluegill fish in 25 seconds. Wanting to experience the thrill of more speed, Aaron turned to amateur car racing which led to professional racing. This past season he did something radical--he charged himself a carbon fee for all of the oil, gas, and tires he used. Host, Peterson Toscano interviews Aaron about this incredibly fast car yet surprisingly effiecient car, carbon pricing, Aaron's favorite foods, and much more. 

Art House

Hope Clark is the director of Wheebarrow Productions. A trained dancer from the USA, Hope began doing community art in Northern Africa. Now based in Kent County Maryland, USA, Hope has turned her attention towards climate change. She is working on a community art piece called Make a Movement. This is a work in progress. Learn how she is attempting to use movement and a very large parachute to help community members young and old to explore climate change. 

Puzzler

Hear an answer to last month's puzzler question: Are these recent extreme weather events in the USA and beyond caused by climate change? 

New Puzzler Question

It is actually not a puzzler, just a question. Do you like this puzzler question segement? Is it helpful? Should we continue with it? Do you have puzzler question suggestions. 

Get back to Peterson by December 20, 2017. Write him: info @ citizensclimate .org

Dig Deeper

Next months episode will explore mental health issues and climate change (drops 25 December 2017)

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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Citizens Climate Radio Ep 17 Resilient Power Puerto Rico

October 23, 2017
 

 

Show host, Peterson Toscano traveled to the island of Manhattan and met with someone engaged in hurricane recovery efforts in Puerto Rico. Ofelia Mangen, an Educational Designer and Technologist  at New York University, talks about climate change and Resilient Power Puerto Rico. This NY-based project has brought emergency solar power to the Puerto Rico. In addition, they are engaged in a project to provide long-term solar production. Ofelia talks about her own experiences in Rockaway, NY during Superstorm Sandy, and useful lessons she learned about resiliency. 

Art House

Peterson shares three books that look back at Hurricane Katrina. Learn about a graphic novel, a work of non-fiction, and a book of poetry

Puzzler Question

We hear your voicemail answers to last month's puzzler question regarding Larry, who thinks windmills are downright ugly.  

This month's puzzler

You are chatting with a neighbor. Let's call her Joan. Joan has family in Florida who were affected by Hurricane Irma. You start talking about climate change and the connections you see to these current weather events. Joan interrupts you, "No you are wrong. Climate change has nothing to do with these hurricanes. They have always had hurricanes. Scientists make it clear that there is no way you can say climate change has anything to do with these storms."

So, is Joan right? How can you effectively and accurately talk about these weather events and climate change?

 Get back to Peterson by November, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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CC Radio Ep 16 Pursuing Climate Justice

September 24, 2017

What do people of color concerned about climate change and environmental impacts to their communities want white climate advocates to know? What roles do climate organizations with mostly white members play in environmental justice work? How do you define "the environment," and what is climate justice? Today we take on a big story. Bigger than any single extreme weather event, we explore the topics of environmental justice and climate justice. We look at how injustice in society, particularly in the USA, deepens suffering during a time of climate change. Peggy Sheppard, the co-founder and executive director of WE ACT For Environmental Justice and Dr. Beverly G Ward, Field Director for Earthcare for the Southeastern Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, talk about their work pursuing environmental and climate justice. 

Art House/Puzzler

We did not want to rush the conversations with our guests, so we do not include an Art House segment or a new puzzler. Peterson will share the answers from last month's puzzler on Ep 17. You still have time to send in your answers. 

Puzzler Question

You are chatting with an acquaintance, let's call him Larry. Somehow you get to talking about windmills and the rapid advances in renewable technology. Larry is sympathetic but bothered by something. He says to you, Yeah, I understand that these windmills can help to get us off of coal and gas, but they look so ugly! I hate how they are destroying the countryside.

So What would you say to Larry? Try to think of something that will open up the conversation and get him to better understand climate change. Get back to Peterson by October, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

 

 

 

 

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