CC Radio Ep 20 When the oil folks embrace the wind

January 20, 2018

Grant Samms was curious about the expansion of wind energy in Western Oklahoma, especially in the oil town of Woodward. He expected to see a lot of conflict there. Turns out there was no conflict. Because of their identity as energy producers, the citizens of Woodward found a way to weave wind energy extraction into their lives and enconomy. 

Grant is currently at Washington College's Center for Environment and Society in Chestertown, Maryland, where he is witnessing tensions in rural Maryland over proposed windmill farms. He chats with Citizens' Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano, about what he learned in Western Oklahoma and how it essential for climate advocates to understand how "sense of place" plays a major role in affecting how communities respond to new ideas.   

Art House

Sila_hunting.jpgChantal Bilodeau is a playwright originally from Quebec Province in Canada. Her award winning plays take on climate change. Set in the Arctic, they are beautiful, original, and are moving audiences all over the world. In her Arctic Cycle plays, she has roles for human and non-human characters. Chantal believes live theater experiences create special opportunities for audiences.

In order to address the lonliness and isolation that can come with doing creative work around global warming, Chantal created Artists and Climate Change, a website that is connecting artists all over the world and making their work known to climate advocates. She is also committed to bringing original quality climate theater to many communities. She talks about Climate Change Theatre Action. Learn how you can easily and inexpensively host a reading of short climate plays. 

Puzzler Question

The Puzzler is BACK! Our latest question is one that often is thrown in the face of climate advocates in order to silence us. 

You are at a community event talking to a neighbor, let's call him Greg. You reveal your passion about climate change and climate solutions. Greg looks you up and down and says, "So I guess you don't use any fossils fuels yourself. You don't drive a car, travel by plane, or heat and cool your home? What are you actually doing to address climate change in your life?"

Greg's question sounds more like an accusation. How do you answer the question while also addressing the accusation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from. Respond by February, 15, 2018. Email radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of three minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Listen, Rate, and Share!

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit RadioGoogle Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook groupor on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CC Radio Ep 20 When the oil folks embrace the wind

January 2, 2018

Grant Samms was curious about the expansion of wind energy in Western Oklahoma, especially in the oil town of Woodward. He expected to witness a lot of conflict. Turns out there was no conflict. Because of their identity as energy producers, the citizens of Woodward found a way to weave wind energy extraction into their lives and enconomy. 

Grant is currently at Washington College's Center for Environment and Society in Chestertown, Maryland, where he is witnessing tensions over proposed windmill farms. He chats with Citizens' Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano, about what he learned in Western Oklahoma and how it essential for climate advocates to understand how "sense of place" plays a major role in affecting how communities respond to new ideas.   

Art House

Sila_hunting.jpgChantal Bilodeau is a playwright originally from Quebec Province in Canada. Her award winning plays take on climate change. Set in the Arctic, they are beautiful, original, and are moving audiences all over the world. In her Arctic Cycle plays, she has roles for human and non-human characters. Chantal believes live theater experiences create special opportunities for audiences.

In order to address the lonliness and isolation that can come with doing creative work around global warming, Chantal created Artists and Climate Change, a website that is connecting artists all over the world and making their work known to climate advocates. She is also committed to bringing original quality climate theater to many communities. She talks about Climate Change Theatre Action. Learn how you can easily and inexpensively host a reading of short climate plays. 

Puzzler Question

The Puzzler is BACK! Our latest question is one that often is thrown in the face of climate advocates in order to silence us. 

You are at a community event talking to a neighbor, let's call him Greg. You reveal your passion about climate change and climate solutions. Greg looks you up and down and says, "So I guess you don't use any fossils fuels yourself. You don't drive a car, travel by plane, or heat and cool your home? What are you actually doing to address climate change in your life?"

Greg's question sounds more like an accusation. How do you answer the question while also addressing the accusation?

Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from. Respond by February, 15, 2018. Email radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of three minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Listen, Rate, and Share!

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook groupor on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

If you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CC Radio Ep 19 Promoting Emotional Health and Bee Populations

December 23, 2017

Being a climate advocate can be an emotional rollercoaster. This is especially true for millennials. From childhood they heard about the many impending dangers threatening their future happiness. How do these feelings affect each of us? How do we cope? How do we move past paralyzing despair to a place of hope and action?

Podcast host, Peterson Toscano, shares a conversation he had with Marlo Firme, a Canadian CCL volunteer climate lobbyist. Marlo powerfully reveals the many ways climate change has affected him personally and professionally. From his boyhood in the Philippines to living in British Columbia, Canada, Marlo could not ignore climate change. Still he found a beautiful way forward. He shares is insights and wisdom. 

The Art House

Can art save the bees? Sculptor Emily Puthoff is a attempting to do just that through the Hudson Valley Bee Habitat. She along with her fellow artists are engaging their community in a large scale art project that builds bee habitats. Learn about this ambitious project and about the essential roles bees play in our everyday life. 

 

Kingston Bee-Line from Emily Puthoff on Vimeo.

Puzzler Question

Do you find having a puzzler question is a helpful feature in the podcast? Tell us if you want to continue with the puzzler question section or if you think we should try something different. Contact Peterson: radio @ citizensclimate.org 

Dig Deeper

Many Ways to Listen and to Share

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

IF you listen on iTunes, please consider rating and reviewing us!

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CCR Ep 18 Aaron Telitz Race Driver Climate Advocate

November 27, 2017

Today on the show you are going to meet an unlikely climate advocate, Aaron Telitz--an Indy car racer. Originally from Birchwood, WI, Aaron grew up at a fishing resort and could filet a bluegill fish in 25 seconds. Wanting to experience the thrill of more speed, Aaron turned to amateur car racing which led to professional racing. This past season he did something radical--he charged himself a carbon fee for all of the oil, gas, and tires he used. Host, Peterson Toscano interviews Aaron about this incredibly fast car yet surprisingly effiecient car, carbon pricing, Aaron's favorite foods, and much more. 

Art House

Hope Clark is the director of Wheebarrow Productions. A trained dancer from the USA, Hope began doing community art in Northern Africa. Now based in Kent County Maryland, USA, Hope has turned her attention towards climate change. She is working on a community art piece called Make a Movement. This is a work in progress. Learn how she is attempting to use movement and a very large parachute to help community members young and old to explore climate change. 

Puzzler

Hear an answer to last month's puzzler question: Are these recent extreme weather events in the USA and beyond caused by climate change? 

New Puzzler Question

It is actually not a puzzler, just a question. Do you like this puzzler question segement? Is it helpful? Should we continue with it? Do you have puzzler question suggestions. 

Get back to Peterson by December 20, 2017. Write him: info @ citizensclimate .org

Dig Deeper

Next months episode will explore mental health issues and climate change (drops 25 December 2017)

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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Citizens Climate Radio Ep 17 Resilient Power Puerto Rico

October 23, 2017
 

 

Show host, Peterson Toscano traveled to the island of Manhattan and met with someone engaged in hurricane recovery efforts in Puerto Rico. Ofelia Mangen, an Educational Designer and Technologist  at New York University, talks about climate change and Resilient Power Puerto Rico. This NY-based project has brought emergency solar power to the Puerto Rico. In addition, they are engaged in a project to provide long-term solar production. Ofelia talks about her own experiences in Rockaway, NY during Superstorm Sandy, and useful lessons she learned about resiliency. 

Art House

Peterson shares three books that look back at Hurricane Katrina. Learn about a graphic novel, a work of non-fiction, and a book of poetry

Puzzler Question

We hear your voicemail answers to last month's puzzler question regarding Larry, who thinks windmills are downright ugly.  

This month's puzzler

You are chatting with a neighbor. Let's call her Joan. Joan has family in Florida who were affected by Hurricane Irma. You start talking about climate change and the connections you see to these current weather events. Joan interrupts you, "No you are wrong. Climate change has nothing to do with these hurricanes. They have always had hurricanes. Scientists make it clear that there is no way you can say climate change has anything to do with these storms."

So, is Joan right? How can you effectively and accurately talk about these weather events and climate change?

 Get back to Peterson by November, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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CC Radio Ep 16 Pursuing Climate Justice

September 24, 2017

What do people of color concerned about climate change and environmental impacts to their communities want white climate advocates to know? What roles do climate organizations with mostly white members play in environmental justice work? How do you define "the environment," and what is climate justice? Today we take on a big story. Bigger than any single extreme weather event, we explore the topics of environmental justice and climate justice. We look at how injustice in society, particularly in the USA, deepens suffering during a time of climate change. Peggy Sheppard, the co-founder and executive director of WE ACT For Environmental Justice and Dr. Beverly G Ward, Field Director for Earthcare for the Southeastern Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, talk about their work pursuing environmental and climate justice. 

Art House/Puzzler

We did not want to rush the conversations with our guests, so we do not include an Art House segment or a new puzzler. Peterson will share the answers from last month's puzzler on Ep 17. You still have time to send in your answers. 

Puzzler Question

You are chatting with an acquaintance, let's call him Larry. Somehow you get to talking about windmills and the rapid advances in renewable technology. Larry is sympathetic but bothered by something. He says to you, Yeah, I understand that these windmills can help to get us off of coal and gas, but they look so ugly! I hate how they are destroying the countryside.

So What would you say to Larry? Try to think of something that will open up the conversation and get him to better understand climate change. Get back to Peterson by October, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit Radio, Google Play, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

 

 

 

 

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Citizens Climate Radio Ep 15 Panama

August 28, 2017

An American doctor becomes a sailor which leads her to climate advocacy in Panama. Hear some of Dr. Tami Kellogg's extraordinary journey. Tami sat down with Citizens' Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano. She explains why she feels hopeful pursuing climate solutions in Central America. 

Art House

Singer Songwriter Anna Fritz is a classically trained cellist. She fuses her artistry with her passions for justice and the environment. The result is a moving duet between this Portland, OR-based musician and her cello. Anna creates a whole new style of folk music. She talks about the inspiration for her songs and her role in encouraging climate advocates. Hear two songs from her new album, On a High Hill. Follow her on Twitter: @annaplayscello

Puzzler

We hear from three listeners who answered last month's puzzler: When I think of climate change, it reminds me of when ______. They dug deep into their past experiences to bring us powerful metaphors to help wrapped our minds and hearts around climate change today. 

New Puzzler Question

You are chatting with an acquaintance, let's call him Larry. Somehow you get to talking about windmills and the rapid advances in renewable technology. Larry is sympathetic but bothered by something. He says to you, Yeah, I understand that these windmills can help to get us off of coal and gas, but they look so ugly! I hate how they are destroying the countryside.

So What would you say to Larry? Try to think of something that will open up the conversation and get him to better understand climate change. Get back to Peterson by September, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbeanNorthern Spirit Radio, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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Citizens Climate Radio Ep 14 Apocalypse Now?

July 24, 2017

Recently some climate communication experts have been freaking out about freaking out. In reaction to a New York Magazine article, The Uninhabitable World, by David Wallace-Wells, a big debate is raging about fear tactics when talking about climate change. We look at the different sides and some of the social science around fear and rhetoric. Joining host, Peterson Toscano, is Halldor Björnsson, the Head of the Atmospheric Research Group at Veðurstofa Iceland also known as the Icelandic Met Office. Also, we hear from Dr. Kristian Bjørkdahl who has earned a PhD in rhetoric and continues his studies at the Centre for Development and the Environment, at the University of Oslo. Oh, and Aristotle makes a surprise cameo appearance. 

Art House

Sung to the tune of Be Our Guests, the Beauty and the Beast classic song, Jason Zeikowitz, a master of sustainability at Arizona State University, performs a showstopper about Scientists. Check out his videos on YouTube  and follow Science Sigh on Twitter 

Puzzler

Last month's question was about food. What is a food you love that is threatened by Climate Change? We hear from three different Citizens' Climate Lobby volunteers who attended the International Conference in Washington, DC.

New Puzzler Question

Using metaphor to talk about climate change is very important. We can relate the effects of climate change or our response to it to our own lives in many ways, including our childhood experiences. So here is your puzzler question: Fill in the blank. When I think about climate change, it reminds me of when ___________  Think back to your childhood. The memory may have absolutely nothing to do with climate change. It might be aobut a loss you experienced, a sudden change in your life, or a revelation about your role in the world. When I think about climate change, it reminds me of when _________. Fill in the  blank and explain.  

 Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from.

Get back to him by August, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org that’s radio @ citizensclimate.orgText Peterson or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.)

Dig Deeper

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbean, and now on Northern Spirit Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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Ep 13 Pets and Climate Change

June 26, 2017

Being forever curious about climate change, podcast host Peterson Toscano asks, How are pets affected by global warming? How is pet care a climate issue? In Episode 13 of Citizens' Climate Radio we explore the many ways pets and climate rub up against each other. Veternarian, Dr. Steva Stowell-Hardcastle, sits down with Peterson and explains how global warming is already affecting pets and farm animals. You will learn how to protect your pet in a time of climate change. You will also discover how to engage pet owners in climate conversations. 

Art House

In the Art House we travel back to the future with Timothy Meadows and That Day in Climate History. Reporting form the year 2167, he reveals the pets of the future.

Puzzler

Listener Eve Simmons answers last month’s puzzler about arctic warming and why it is such a big deal when it comes to climate change. 

New Puzzler Question

What is a food you love that is affected by climate change? How exactly is global warming threatening it?  

Get back to Peterson by July, 15, 2017. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org that’s radio @ citizensclimate.org Text Peterson or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.) That number again is 570.483.8194

Dig Deeper

Climate Change and Pets 

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbean, and now on Northern Spirit Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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Citizens Climate Radio Ep 12 Values with Marshall Saunders and Leslie Beatty

May 22, 2017

Our individual values shape us. They help us make decisions and influence our relationships. They keep us on the right path. Organzitions and movements are also be guided by values. As climate advocates, we come to this work with our own set of values. Citizens' Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano speaks with marketing researcher and volunteer climate advocate, Lesley Beatty about the Citizens' Climate Lobby's Core Values. CCL founder Marshall Saunders joins in the conversation with a burst of optimism.

Art House

Marshall Saunders sticks around to help with our Art House segment. He has a book recommendation to share, a novel written in 1899 by Leo Tolstoy. Marshall tells us why he thinks climate advocates should read Tolstoy's Resurrection. South African author, Glen Retief reads excerpts from the novel.

Puzzler

In answer to last month's puzzler question listeners wrote and left voice memos to share the climate change resources for people just getting involved in climate advocacy. Find links in Dig Deeper section below.

New Puzzler Question

You are at a family event. Everyone is catching up and having a good time. You have cornered your uncle and are updating him about your climate work. Your Uncle, let's call him Jim, says, "Ok, maybe this is a stupid question, but what is the big deal with melting glaciers? It seems everything I read about climate change, they are freaking out about these glaciers. Why the obsession?"

So, how do you respond to Uncle Jim? In addition to the science behind glacial melting, what will you say to deepn the conversation?  Send Peterson your answers. Leave your name, contact info, and where you are from.

Get back to him by June, 15, 2017. If you see Peterson at the Citizens' Climate International Conference June 11 and 12th, say hi and he can record your answer. You can also email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org that’s radio @ citizensclimate.org Text Peterson or leave a voicemail of 3 minutes or less at 570.483.8194. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.) That number again is 570.483.8194

Dig Deeper

Climate Change Resources from Puzzler Question

You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunesStitcher RadioPodbean, and now on Northern Spirit Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

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